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How Does Society Determine Insurance Coverage For Rare Diseases And Orphan Drugs ?

November 7, 2012

             A recent Hastings Center article says that the “ … rule of rescue describes the moral impulse to save identifiable lives in immediate danger at any expense ….. Yet should this same moral instinct to rescue, regardless of cost, be applied ….. In health care, the desire to save lives at any cost must be reconciled with the reality of resource scarcity …….”. 

        The Hastings Center article concludes that “ …. The moral instinct will remain: the desire to help those weakest among us …. “. This is an important issue in healthcare that modern society now faces – deciding who is to receive insurance coverage and who is not to receive insurance coverage.       

       Emily Largent and Steven Pearson are the authors of a fascinating journal article that examines this issue.     

       Below is the citation and link to a FREE download to the article : 

Emily A. Largent and Steven D. Pearson. Which Orphans Will Find a Home ? The Rule of Rescue in Resource Allocation for Rare Diseases. Hastings Center Report, Volume 42, Issue 1 (2012): 27-34.

References 

The Hastings Center article titled,” Which Orphans Will Find a Home ? The Rule of Rescue in Resource Allocation for Rare Diseases”    

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One Comment
  1. Thank you for visiting the Orphan Druganaut Blog & including the very important topic of “orphan drugs & rare diseases” and insurance coverage on you Blog.

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