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Orphan Drugs: US Shift To Higher Prices For Smaller Patient Populations

September 26, 2014

EvaluatePharma publishes in September 2014, the report, “Budget-Busters: The shift to high-priced innovator drugs in the USA”, which examines and analyzes data from the top 100 selling drugs in the United States. The report concludes that in the United States over the last 5 years, there has been a definite shift in drug spending in the direction of high-priced medications, which treat smaller patient populations – trend towards specialty and orphan drugs.

Several major findings of the report are:

•   Median revenue/patient of the top 100 drugs increases from $1,260 in 2010 to $9,400 in 2014 – a 646% increase over just 4 years

•   Median patient population size served by a top 100 drug decreases from 690,000 in 2010 to 146,000 in 2014 – a decrease of approximately 80% over 4 years

•   4 drugs of the top 100 drugs have prices of > $100,000/patient/year in 2010, while in 2014, 7 drugs have prices of > $100,000/patient/year.

% of US Top 100 Drugs By # of Patients Treated/Year/Drug (2010 vs. 2014)

Patient Population Size  2010 * 2014 * % Change**
0 – 100,000 23% 41% + 78%
100,000 – 500,000 22% 24% + 9%
> 500,000 55% 35% – 36%

* Data from EvaluatePharma   ** Orphan Druganaut Calculation

OBSERVATIONS

•   In 2010, 55% of the top US 100 drugs were for a patient population of > 500,000

•   In 2014, 35% of the top US 100 drugs were for a patient population of > 500,000

•   In 2010, 23% of the top US 100 drugs were for a patient population < 100,000

•   In 2014, 41% of the top US 100 drugs were for a patient population < 100,000.

Please Note: “Kalymnos 2005 022” by David Bolius [CC By-SA 2.5] | Wikimedia Commons.

Copyright © 2012-2014, Orphan Druganaut Blog. All rights reserved.

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